Tag: volkswagen

New Volkswagen Touareg: First Drive

Volkswagen Touareg

We Drive the New Volkswagen Touareg

It’s amazing what happens to us when we get older. In my twenties, what was important in a vehicle was its looks, my friend’s opinion and of course, what members of the opposite sex would say when I rocked up in my sweet wheels. Now, in my thirties, with a seven-month-old in tow, what I want out of a vehicle is completely different.

Volkswagen Touareg

 

My daily “run around” is an SUV. I’m that guy who has, besides some dirt roads on a friend’s farm, never taken it off-road. Why? I don’t hunt or do “outdoorsy” stuff, simple. I’m a city dweller who is very happy to be eye level with taxi drivers. I also have the rear seat filled with toys to amuse a very cute human. So,  when the invite for the local launch of the new Volkswagen Touareg came into TheMotorist inbox, I was the first to put my hand up, naturally.

Volkswagen Touareg

In its third generation, the VW Touareg has grown up. Sharing its DNA with some of the biggest names in the field, namely the Bentley Bentayga, Porsche Cayenne and Audi Q7. The new Touareg has all the underpinnings of a superstar. Having done my homework before the launch, to say that I was excited and had big expectations would be an understatement. On arrival, what strikes you from your first introduction is the presence the vehicle has. From its imposing grill accompanied with its vast use of chrome, the face of the Touareg is one that would be quite intimidating to see in your rear-view mirror. You take in its profile and you are greeted with a vehicle that clearly shows that good looks run in the family, as you see bits of the Audi Q7 and Porsche Cayenne in its design.Volkswagen Touareg

Open the door and you’ll be very impressed. Its interior is one that is just sublime. From the materials used, to the layout of the infotainment screen, you may just find yourself thinking “what’s the lounge TV doing in the dashboard?” It’s that big. The screen is also angled toward the driver, cocooning you in tech – with minimal buttons to add to the very modern look. As stunning as this all this however,  you do wonder how many times you will have to wipe the screen to maintain this chicness. It’s a sacrifice worth paying however because it does make the cabin extra special.

Volkswagen Touareg

Under the bonnet:

Powering this new generation Touareg is a 3.0 V6 turbocharged diesel, the only engine to be offered by Volkswagen South Africa and for good reason. With 600Nm and 190kW, this power-plant isn’t shy when you call on the power. It arrives in waves, giving you the muscle you need to perform any overtaking manoeuvre, big or small. The reason for one engine to be offered? Demand. For a very long time, I have held the opinion that there isn’t a need for ridiculously powered SUVs. As fun as it may be to have all that power at your disposal, these are cars are meant to do the school and shopping run with entire families in them – so the real chances of exploiting that performance is minimal. As a result, VW have opted to go the practical route with its engine offering.

Volkswagen Touareg

My driving partner Sam Ayres and I got acquainted with this new vehicle in the leafy green province of Port Elizabeth with our end destination being Plettenberg Bay. We took off in the top of the range Executive with R-line package which was shod with the 20” wheels and tyres combination. With its air suspension (standard equipment on the Executive), ride was compliant and positive. Steering feedback is electric, but easy to place and the vehicle has a natural way of hiding its mass. After a few kilometres, the vehicle seems to shrink around you dynamically, giving you the impression of driving a rather spacious sedan – something the likes of BMW have done well over the years in their X5. This is a great compliment as a “tall SUV” doesn’t inspire confidence, whereas the new Touareg certainly does. With buttons being a thing of the past, you also find that the optional but very worth it “Innovision Cockpit” very intuitive. Especially after you’ve found the perfect way to personalise your Touareg. When nightfall happens, it looks like you are driving a vehicle from a sci-fi movie. With thirty interior colours to choose from, your young ones will have you planning your family trips at night, so that they can enjoy the show.

The Drive:

The drive to Plettenberg Bay included some forty kilometres on gravel roads with sharp hairpin corners to allow us to test the suspension. A simple switch over to the gravel/dirt setting on the air suspension and you’re good to go. The mighty diesel engine comes into its own and the suspension damping softens enough to not make you feel like you are doing something out of the ordinary.

Volkswagen Touareg

Along with offering just the one engine, you also only get two options of specification level. The Executive with the R Line package, as well as the Luxury. Both these packages come with a good amount of standard features, giving you a brief options list to choose from. My choice would be the Executive with the optional twenty-one-inch wheels to give it the “gangster look” a young dad would like. As mentioned, I don’t go off-road, so don’t worry about me getting a flat tyre in Sandton. This package comes with the host of driver assist features that are as long as the vehicle, namely Adaptive Cruise Control, Lane Assist, Side Assist, Night Vision, Panoramic Sliding Roof, Discover Pro Navigation and and and.

Volkswagen Touareg

The result?

What we have now is a Volkswagen SUV that can take on the mighty BMW X5, Range Rover Sport as well as the Mercedes GLE in all aspects.  From a quality, performance, technology and overall appeal. It is still more understated than its rivals, but in a classy way. Being a Volkswagen, it won’t shock you from a price point of view either, which is good considering what SUVs cost today. Impressed is an understatement, Volkswagen have truly outdone themselves. We’ll take a Black one please!

 

New Volkswagen Touareg Pricing in South Africa

Touareg 3.0 V6 TDI 190kW (Luxury)                    R999 800

Touareg 3.0 V6 TDI 190kW (Executive)                R1 088 200

The new Touareg comes standard with a 5 year/100 000km Maintenance Plan, 3 year/120 000km warranty, 12-year anti-corrosion warranty and space saver spare wheel. Service Interval is 15 000km.

Take Off Your Blinkers – Volkswagen Arteon Driven

Volkswagen Arteon

We Drive the New Volkswagen Arteon

Let’s face it, VW’s Passat was one of its least-loved vehicles. It reminds me of those movies which feature that one workmate which no one gets along with. However, when given the chance, you find out that Gwendoline has a wicked sense of humour and has stories from all her travels around the world. She is awesome and you wish that you had given her a chance all these years.Well, just like in Hollywood movie, Gwendoline has a life makeover, changes her appearance, loses a ton of weight and changes her name to “G Money” and the office is a buzz with the new staff member that they have. All the girls want to be her and the guys want to date her. Well, ladies and gentlemen, we give you the new Volkswagen Arteon.

Volkswagen Arteon

Brand new from the ground up, the “Sport Coupe GTE” wowed the crowds at its premiere in 2015 but normally, when vehicle looks that good, you expect the manufacturer to tone it down with the final production model and give you something that was in-line with the design cues but not the car that caused you to have it as a screen saver on your laptop. No, not this time my fellow car people! If you pull up the pictures from 2015, the vehicle looks 99% identical to the vehicle that is now in front of me.

We got the grips with this brand-new vehicle at Volkswagen’s head office in Sandton and after the media briefing, which I missed as I was in awe as to how stunning this car is, we were thrown into peak hour Sandton traffic on route to our drive event, hosted at Swartkops raceway. Two engines are on offer from launch and my driving partner and I were in the 2.0 TDI DSG, with 350Nm of torque and 130kW. This ensured that we not only kept up with traffic, but also ushered people out of the fast lane as the diesel motor has a wide spread of torque in any gear, and was a peach to drive. I must say that I am one of the petrol heads that has seen the light, for a daily commuter I see the benefit of the diesel motor and with this current crop of diesels around, it’s amazing that people still have a petrol vehicle for the daily commute. But then again, I do understand why this specific petrol motor was included in the fold. With 206kW and with the same torque as the diesel, this is for the corporate racer that wants the Golf R feel in a premium skin.

Volkswagen Arteon

As is my custom, the first drive was handled by my co-pilot and was thoroughly impressed by the infotainment system and layout of the whole cabin. Its beyond spacious and due to it being front wheel drive, it lacks the transmission tunnel which plagues most of the vehicle in this class-it was refreshing to find so much space in the rear. On arriving at Swartkops, we were given a breakdown of the design features of the Arteon and saw how the designers have stayed so close to the concept. Tip from VW, if your concept receives as much praise theirs did, don’t stray and then you keep your clients base happy. Speaking of clients…

The Arteon is aimed at the mid exec class so it comes into the BMW 3 series, Mercedes C Class and Cousin Audi A4 fold in terms of product placement. Now this is where we as South Africans need to strip our biases aside. Traditionally, in the buying cycle of a client, we go from the first car, into a mid-sized hatch or small sedan. VW has no problem with those clients as that’s where the first introduction happened and Polo Vivo and Golf sales speak for themselves. The issue happens when clients go from say a Golf GTI to something else as normally, circumstances necessitate a sedan and the “German Three” are the default. This is where the Arteon comes in. With the Arteon being such a formidable contender VW need to do all that they can to showcase that as they now have a vehicle that can stand toe to toe with the stalwarts of this segment, but its also up to the consumer to take off their blinkers and look at what other options that they have in this segment.

Volkswagen Arteon

We have the pleasure of finding out the handling capabilities of the Arteon at the track and was pleasantly surprised as to how little body roll there was and yes, being front wheel drive for the diesel and 4Motion for the petrol, there was some understeer which that came to the fore when pushed hard, something that if you are doing on public roads, you deserve to have your tyres humbled by the pavement.

So, VW now have a serious contender for the premium segment and if marketed well and clients get to experience the vehicle, there will a lot more on the road and from the day and a half that we spent with the Arteon, you will be making the right choice. G Money will change your perspective for the good!

Tiguan Allspace – Because we all need more “space”

Tiguan Allspace South Africa

Who needs more space? We live in a world where we need larger “clouds”, more memory on our phones, a bigger Netflix library and for photographers, an endless amount of hard drives. In short, more space is always more welcomed.

We embarked on a drive from Durban to Karkloof Spa in the Natal Midlands in a vehicle which offers more of exactly that, space. Befittingly named, the new Tiguan Allspace won’t help if your 256 GB IPhone X has run out of memory, but if you always find yourself with one bag (or person) too many on a family road trip, it will probably come in handy.

VW Tiguan Allspace

So what is the Tiguan Allspace? Volkswagen used the wonderful base that is the standard Tiguan and simply made it 215mm longer. While there are ever-so-slight design changes, the overall look and feel is pretty much identical to the normal wheelbase Tiguan which most seemed to love.  While 215mm might not sound like much, it equates to an increase in boot space volume of 115-litres which provides much more storage space, or two seats – the Tiguan Allspace gives you the option to choose.

While the Allspace is 7-seater vehicle, anyone that resembles a teenager or adult will really struggle to fit. The rear seats are much more suited for younger children and while you may feel like this really narrows down the uses, there are many scenarios in which they will come in handy. When not in use the third row of seats fold completely flat and I feel this is a setup which many will enjoy – giving you spacious seating for five occupants and plenty of boot space.

As with the normal wheelbase Tiguan, the Allspace is lovely to drive with my favourite model being the Highline variant, as it is paired with a 2.0-litre 162kW petrol engine and VW’s world famous DSG gearbox. The vehicle is practical, but the powertrain offers the element of fun we all enjoy and sometimes crave. The 110kW diesel variant also on offer was really was impressive to drive. Smooth, quiet and “torquey” are all great words to describe this option – whilst also being a cracker on fuel. I however spent much more time with the new 132kW petrol option now available in the Allspace Comfortline, as we had a short but fiery love affair down the South Coast of Durban.  While shy on power when compared with the Highline, the performance on offer is plenty for most situations and is a really cool option for those a little more conscious of price and fuel economy.  There is also fourth option – a 110Kw 1.4 petrol which falls into the Trendline model. LED daytime running lights, the Lights and Visibility Package, Front Underbody Protection, chrome trapezoidal panels around the tailpipes and privacy glass, come as standard on the normal wheelbase Tiguan.

If I can sup up the Tiguan Allspace up in just a few words, it would be “Beautifully Practical”. It offers the vibe, looks and personality that the normal Tiguan offers, but just with more space. Honestly, I can’t see a reason why I would choose a standard Tiguan over the Allspace, as the extra space makes a big difference. While the only compromise would really be a slightly higher price if you opt for the Allspace, in the long term, I think it’s worth it.

Tiguan Allspace

Karkloof really put the Tiguan Allspace into perspective for me. Driving through amazing landscapes with your family or friends is what this car is about. Going further, more comfortably with the people that mean the most. While I would love to own a Tiguan,  the only reason I could justify purchasing one now is if I started a family…I will chat to my wife tonight.

Viva La Vivo – We Drive Volkswagen’s latest Polo Vivo

New Polo Vivo Driven

Go to any city or town in South Africa and get a sense of the people, places and cultures, it will soon become very obvious that the place in which we live is unique. While doing this,  you will most definitely spot a VW Polo Vivo in the background – another one of South Africa’s unique flavours.

Nando’s chicken is a perfect example. Those new to the spicy chicken brand can opt for the lemon and herb flavour, allowing them to get a feel for the food and sit in the restaurant and take in the vibe.  Similarly, Volkswagen have targeted the Vivo for those new on the roads, it may not offer all the spice a Polo or Golf may offer, but it’s a great starting point that gets you from A to B, while being trendy in the process. In a country like ours to the Vivo makes sense, especially for city dwellers who need something small, but comfortable enough for a weekend away. Speaking of weekends away, I headed down the coast to sample the latest flavour – the new Polo Vivo.

 

A swift flight down the coast landed us in the home of VW Port Elizabeth, where we would take a beautiful coastal drive to “Plett” in the Polo Vivo. While this car is based on the previous generation Polo, changes to the front lights and grille, as well as a sprucing to the rear lights are just one of the reasons why the new Polo Vivo is an attractive option.

Volkswagen also offer a new version of the flagship Polo Vivo as well, which goes by the name Polo Vivo GT. If looking cool is your aim and standing out is your game, the Polo Vivo GT will have you covered. Better styling and the latest 1.0 3-cylinder engine, makes it the pick of the bunch. Inside you will find an 8-inch infotainment system which will keep your varsity friends impressed, especially as it features App Connect, or in other words Apple CarPlay. If there is one feature vehicles aimed at the youth must have, it’s this. Thankfully, the GT doesn’t just look the part, it drives it too. The 81kW on offer provides “pokey” performance that will impress bae, while covering your pocket with reasonable fuel bills.

Our road trip only got better as we enjoyed the beautiful scenery provided the Tsitsikamma region – a personal favorite location of mine. It was at this point that we chose to jump into the 1.4 Comfortline, instead of attempting the highest bungee jump in Africa – something the Tsitsikamma region offers. This model is the younger brother to the high-flying GT model, so it offers you less but you also pay less, which is music to any young persons ears. If you are a first-time buyer on a budget, this variant will be well suited for you. The equipment list may be sparse when compared with the GT, but it still very much looks the part – I mean the Vivo is based on the previous generation Polo, how can it not look good?

The 1.4 model features no fancy turbo but rather a bigger displacement which provides adequate performance, especially in the coast. Yes, the Vivo is a little bare compared to a Polo and road noise is more prevalent, but when your hustling city traffic on your way to varsity, while playing your tunes and debating with your S/O about whether to play Big Shaq or Distruction Boyz – you’re not going to notice it.

After our driving was done for the day, we enjoyed an actual game of Polo (The one with Horses) and many of us did stints on Volkswagen Blue Bike to really get the heart going.  There is nothing like a hearty meal after a workout, and our evening dinner was very welcomed with a South African style braai to really fit in with the theme of our trip.

Waking up for a beautiful Plettenberg Bay sunrise the next day, this was followed by breakfast and heading back to PE – another chance to sample a different Vivo. This time we would be eating up the road ahead in the Polo Vivo 1.6 Comfortline. Offering more power than its 1400cc sibling, slightly more features and a cheaper price-tag than the top of the line GT, it is definitely a good middle ground. A bigger engine means more power, 77Kw to be exact compared to the 1.4’s 63kW.

The original Vivo was previously a great option new to the market motorists. Thankfully the new model maintains the same appeal. Yes, it may not be dirt cheap, but you do get what you pay for. The new model looks better and offers better performance in the GT variant. With much more tech offered compared to the previous car, it is still very much suited for the entry-level motorist and offers a cool but reliable option.

 

New Polo Vivo Pricing In South Africa

1.4 55kW Trendline                     R179 900

1.4 63kW Comfortline                  R192 000

1.6 77kW Comfortline Tiptronic     R221 900

1.6 77kW Highline                       R214 900

1.0 TSI 81kW GT                          R245 000

The New Volkswagen Polo – Bigger and Better.

New Volkswagen Polo

The New Volkswagen Polo Driven Review

New Volkswagen Polo. Despite being a small A0 segment hatchback, the Volkswagen Polo is a big car in South Africa. Last year alone VW SA sold over 20,000 units, and the all-new model proves to be even better with a new design and exciting array of tech features. To sample the new vehicle first hand, we headed to the home of VW South Africa – Port Elizabeth, where the new Polo is being manufactured.

Arriving late in the afternoon gave us a  chance to relax, take in our surroundings and enjoy the views our hotel had on offer. Still, we were itching to see the vehicle and get behind the wheel of a car which is very important to the motoring industry and South Africa alike. That evening gave us all what we wanted, and more. After the unveiling of the New Volkswagen Polo and a short presentation, we were whisked away from the plush surroundings of our hotel to the Tramways building. Here we were presented with the 2018 Polo Cup race-car. Featuring the same engine as the upcoming Polo GTI, a 2.0-litre turbo mill producing 150kW and 340 N.m. The vehicle had undergone the usual race-car preparation, which means it was completely stripped out and fitted with a roll cage, with a single seat for the driver being left behind. ( read more about the 2018 Polo Cup here) A night of tasty food and good conversation followed before our early rise the next morning and with a 290 km route planned around the more scenic areas of the Eastern Cape. We were excited to see how VW’s 1.0-litre 3-cylinder turbo engine would perform in varying situations,  as well as get up close and personal with the new interior and exterior design. I really like the Polo’s new look, even as base spec it gives off a somewhat sporty appearance. I do feel the front end may be the my least favourite area of the car, from a design point of view. This however is definitely improved with the addition of LED lighting system. In terms of specifications on the car, VW had the Beats edition and Comfortline models on offer for us and we headed out in the former first.

The Beats edition of the new Polo has two stand out features, with the first obviously being a 300-watt Beats Audio sound system. This leads us on to the second area in which the Polo beats differs – styling. Vibrant red trim, Beats styled seats and the odd Beats Logo will greet anyone entering the cabin and yes, the sound system packs a punch!

As with most things, practice makes perfect and VW’s 1.0-litre engine seems to be getting better and better. The 70kW provided gives a nice little punch and is quite a “gutsy” engine – if that is even a word. Highway driving might seem to provide the most worry for these little engines, but overtaking was a breeze and the 5-speed gearbox was just like an R&B/Soul song – smooth and easy. If you are wanting even more kick, there is a Highline 85kW option using the same 1.0-litre engine. Both the 70kW and 80kW engines are available with a DSG automatic gearbox. 

Too grown up for its own good?

The Polo has always been a small, fun city hatchback with renowned build quality. As time goes by and new models are released, these vehicles inherently get bigger in size and the New Volkswagen Polo is not excluded from this. It’s 8 cm longer and 7 cm wider, this extra space benefits the rear passenger area and the place where you put your bags on a road trip with an extra 70l to play with. Even still, the new Polo has not lost that all-important feel of nimbleness. Yes, it’s bigger, but it has not grown in height. If anything, the good road-holding and intimate feel that we all love, has not been lost but rather improved.

Another area where the New Volkswagen Polo impressed us most is technology. A clean dash features an integrated 8” touchscreen with VW’s latest Composition Media system, which is also found in the brand’s more expensive vehicles. Discover Navigation is also available as an option, but with Apple CarPlay integrated into the system, the navigation system is no longer something on the “need” list.

We were very impressed with VW for including their Active Info Display as an option in the new Polo. If you’re of what we’re referring to, the Active Info Display is a fully digital 12” display which replaces the classic dials which provide you which information on speed – such as fuel consumption, range etc. This digital option is customisable, meaning the driver can choose what information they want to be displayed, whether this be music, playlists, speed and even navigation. This system is a premium feature found on the new Golf, Passat and Tiguan range. This really sets the Polo apart in the A0 segment – although you will have to pay for it.

Other great technology and safety systems are on offer, such as the Park Assist Package. If you require, this system will parallel park you into a space which is just 80 cm longer than the vehicle itself. Added to that, it will also assist the driver is getting out of that same space if required. Blind Spot Monitor, Rear Traffic Alert, Driver Alert System, Multi Collision Braking and Tyre Pressure Loss Indicator are also systems available to the Polo – providing yet more reasons to get behind the wheel of Volkswagen’s latest creation.

Overall it was another great event with a fantastic vehicle. The new Polo is refined in every area and provides an even better experience than the former car. It appeals very much to a younger generation of drivers who want the latest technology and want to be connected. That being said, the features available also make this car very appealing to someone who may be buying down from a more premium segment. Personally, my gut feel says the Polo Beats will do very well and it is my prefered choice from the models we sampled. The Beats naturally appeals to the younger generation as we all know who Dr.Dre is. Music lovers in general though and those who appreciate good quality audio will be impressed by the vehicle. The car ticks many boxes for many demographics. The stylish, the safety conscious, the youth and even parents with a healthy budget will enjoy this vehicle for their kids. Well done VW. You haven’t tried to fix something that was never broken to begin with.   

New Volkswagen Polo Pricing in South Africa

1.0 TSI 70kW Trendline                                     R 235 900

1.0 TSI 70kW Comfortline                                 R 264 700

1.0 TSI 70kW Comfortline DSG                         R 280 700

1.0 TSI 85kW Highline                                      R 286 200

1.0 TSI 85kW Highline DSG                              R 302 200

VW Golf R & GTD First Drive.

Golf GTD

Golf GTI’s older brother and new sibling driven

The GTI is and will always be the star of the show. The “Vrrrpah” phenomenon was started by this very vehicle. It’s quite peculiar then the actual flagship of the Golf range doesn’t have as much street cred as its younger sibling, to non-car folk. Heritage comes a long way and that’s something the GTI has as an advantage. Those three letters have been engrained in our hearts and minds from a young age. That being said, everyone respects the Golf R and what it represents – a four wheel drive hatchback that can stick with some interesting cars that are more powerful. The Golf R has been a success locally and South Africans will be happy to know that it too has been face-lifted, giving it a more pronounced look and sharper design. Although subtle, the entire refreshed Golf range makes you forget that the 7th generation has been with us for a while. Making us forget even further is the addition of a new variant, the GTD, a sporty diesel version that is loved overseas. Let’s take a look at what’s changed and most importantly answer the question, “Can a diesel Golf really be exciting?”.

Golf R

Golf R:  The looks and drive.

The Golf R has always looked menacing. The updated model now has a different LED light design in the front and rear, as well as a more “smiley” bumper construction. The added black gloss bits are a big differentiator between the old car and the new one. The overall look is pleasing but falls on the slightly softer side compared to the previous car. The wheel design has also been changed, making keen observers look twice as the vehicle drives by. On the inside we have a stunning optional infotainment system to play with, fitted with Navigation and Apple CarPlay. The mind has to get used to not having a volume knob but rather touch sensitive icons to adjust how loud your music is, something you’ll be doing a lot if your car is fitted with the DynAudio sound system. Another new feature is the Active Info Display which gives us a digital dashboard, something all new cars seem to be coming with recently. The most important feature for Golf R lovers is not the trimming but rather the engine. Power is up to 213kW from 206kW giving the car some added oomph and excitement. As much as the GTI is the star child, the R is in a different league in terms of performance. All its power is exploitable, giving the driver confidence that other cars can’t. Since it uses the 4Mototion system, it has no problem getting up to speed, so much so if you’re not careful, you’ll easily break the law without realising. Being a car that uses all four wheels when needed through a haldex system, the car provides massive amounts of grip. If you respect it around corners and don’t come into bends at ridiculous speeds, you can easily power out of corners aggressively without any drama. Overall the car is properly fast, safe and exciting whilst still maintaining a sense of composure about it.

VW GOLF GTD

Diesel hot-hatch, really?

Experiencing the GTD after the Golf R shocks the system at first. You almost need a palate cleanser to remove any expectations from the mind. When that is done, you can begin to appreciate what the GTD is, a diesel Golf with the GTI chassis. It only produces 130kW and 350N.m, but together the pairing is delightful. There is no DCC mode in the car so I can’t change from Comfort to Sport mode, it’s just a matter of sticking the DSG gearbox into Sport and riding the torque. On long stretches the GTD reacts like any old diesel, but it’s when things tighten up that you enjoy the constant boost. In town the power-train is also very useful, always ready to give you the torque when you want it. I can imagine the GTD being the car that is bought by the percentage of Golf buyers who previously owned a 2.0 TDI but wanted more. The appeal is understandable and the decision to bring it to SA soil is justifiable. A VW crazy country like ours will have a place for this car.

VW GOLF GTD

The recipe that works:   

At the end of the day what makes the Golf so popular is the fact that it’s not small. A young family can easily own a Golf and not feel compromised. The GTI has always fused two worlds together and the Golf R takes that fusion to another level. The GTD is a total spanner in the works as it has such a different appeal yet still manages to pull at the heart strings. The biggest issue people are faced with is the cost of new cars in general of late. With a sticker price of R507 700 for the GTD and R647 000 for the Golf R, these are not small amounts at all. Looking at the competition however, you’ll see similar figures. For many looking at a Golf R, the likes of a BMW M140i may be an option as well but it all boils down to preference in the end. Soon we’ll put the M140i and the Golf R head to head and weigh up what comes out on top. One thing is for sure, the Golf is a worthy rival, a car that punches way above its weight.

VW GOLF GTD

 

Golf R & Golf GTD Pricing in South Africa

VW Golf R: R647 000

VW Golf GTD: R507 700

The new VW Tiguan is the coolest family car on the road!

VW Tiguan 2.0 TDI

The new Vw Tiguan is the coolest family car on the road.

I have a vivid memory of driving the new VW Tiguan in its 1 400 cc petrol variant towards the end of 2016 and I loved it. The design, style, chassis and all round coolness were just some of the goods that stood out to me. I did, however, express the thought to many people that with a DSG gearbox and a punchy 2.0-litre engine in either a diesel or petrol variant, the Tiguan would go from being a solid C to an A+.

Unfortunately I’ve never received an A+, that was until I was handed the keys to a metallic Indium Grey Tiguan with an R-Line kit and a 105 kW 2.0 TDI engine, with DSG of course. After driving this variant for a couple of days, my mind was settled. The new Tiguan had to be the coolest everyday car on the road.

VW Tiguan 2.0 TDI

As one would expect, the Tiguan is buttery smooth, easy to drive, fantastic on fuel and additionally holds it own in a corner with the benefits of the optional sports suspension. It doesn’t matter that the 2.0 TDI engine feels slightly underpowered because there is a 130 kW option available, if that’s the type of thing you are looking for.  It also doesn’t matter that there is a little too much interior plastic, especially on the door cards, because no one really spends much of their time looking at them. This car is by no means perfect, the rear trays are also a little flimsy, the boot space isn’t fantastic and I wasn’t a huge fan of more plastic on the wheel arches, albeit subtle.

None of these points would have made the new Tiguan rank any lower or higher on the TopGear cool wall which was sadly scrapped with the old show, hopefully the new show will follow suit, but that’s a story for another day.

So what makes the Tiguan the coolest family car on the road? Its visual appearance and  the feelings it conjures in the driver. There are some fantastic looking vehicles on our roads today but not many of them are under 600k and look as prestigious from every angle as the Tiguan does. The black accents against the metallic grey paint are striking and stunning. Its appearance is frighteningly aggressive and sexy at the same time, walking out to this car everyday certainly does not get old. I can almost guarantee you that a Tiguan in this color with this trim will give you the best looking car in your block, road, neighbourhood or town, provided none of your neighbours own the only Rolls-Royce Sweptail.

New VW Tiguan

Now we can tackle the point on how it makes you feel. It has style and Pizzaz which gives you as the driver an extra boost of confidence in the morning without the need to take a sneaky swig of whiskey. It’s hard to explain, but I felt like the gentleman in the stereotypical German car advert. You know, he wakes up looking fantastic, walks outside of his exquisite ultra modern mansion and jumps into his some or other German car and drives through picturesque scenery. Something like that anyway.

The men in these types of adverts always seem to have their lives in perfect order, now my life is not exactly falling to pieces but if yours is, buy a Tiguan, it will make everything feel great again.

Add this to a great driving experience, tons of gadgets, a starting price of R530k and a young,hip, fun loving personality and quite frankly  you have yourself the coolest family car on the road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volkswagen strikes back: Volkswagen Amarok V6 launched in South Africa

Volkswagen Amarok V6

Volkswagen Amarok V6 launched in South Africa

Back in 2010 when Volkswagen announced that the Amarok will only feature 2.0 litre engines, bakkie lovers were up in arms. “We need more power! We need more displacement!” the angry hoards and picketers screamed, forming a mob and carrying flaming objects whilst protesting toward their local VW dealers. Well that’s what we assume happened in certain parts of town where anything under 3.0 litres is an insult to someone’s manliness. This burning issue however was not really about power, because despite the Amarok 2.0 TDI producing 132kW and 440Nm, what people had a problem with was the size of the engine. So much so, the Amarok didn’t really take off as well in South Africa as VW had hoped it would. People are still buying the Toyota Hilux and Ford Ranger in droves, don’t forget the Isuzu KB as well. As a result Volkswagen have seen the need for change, drastic change at that. What, then, could be more drastic than a bakkie that produces 165 kW/550 N.m? How about a bakkie that produces 180 kW and 580 N.m on over-boost? Yes the new Amarok V6 is in a different performance league when it comes to pick-ups available in South Africa.

Bakkie SUV?

To be honest, the Volkswagen Amarok has always had a few advantages over its rivals, but it seems as though those advantages weren’t ever enough. Take for example the cabin and ride quality, there is nothing agricultural about the car. Instead, the Amarok is arguably the best dual purpose lifestyle bakkie out there. People don’t care however, people want power. That is why the combination of the updated cabin and the engine are a match made in bakkie heaven as you get the best of both worlds. A large touch screen infotainment is now offered in the Amarok, giving you features like Apple CarPlay as well as Bluetooth and other smart features. Ergonomically you feel like you’re in a Golf up front, of course the rear seats are still more “truckish” but purely because you have a load bin behind you and nothing’s going to change that. The overall interior and comfort levels in the V6 are fantastic, you’d swear you’re in an SUV, especially without the rackety noise of the 2.0 TDI.

 

Is all that power necessary?

No. There is no real need for all that power, unless you plan on ploughing the fields in the morning or towing your mobile home with you. Quite honestly, the power offered in the 2.0 TDI is sufficient for the average bakkie owner. The thing is though, once you put your foot down in the V6 and you feel the surge of torque – you realise that this is not power you need, it’s power you want. Once you’ve experienced it, you don’t want it to go away. The powertrain offered in the V6 Amarok can be best described as a very rich dessert, a chocolate mousse even. If you’re not a lover of chocolate mousse, you need to rethink your entire life and maybe even see someone about that.
Oh by the way, it’s not only power that’s changed in the Amarok, the front end looks different too…slightly. The entire range has been face-lifted, with minor changes giving the car a fresher face. The choices are as follows: Comfortline, Highline, Highline Plus and Extreme. The engines range from a 103kW 2.0 TDI to the 132kW 2.0 TDI and then of course, the V6 we’ve been crushing over. If money is no object and you only want the best, the top of the range Extreme model is available. This will equip your Amarok with Satellite navigation, 20 inch wheels, Bi-Xenon headlights and even 12 way adjustable “ergoComfort” seats as some of the standard features.


All these features sound like items you would get in an SUV, but that’s what the bakkie market wants. Thankfully you can still go into Africa and see the dusty sights in your Amarok. The car features an Electronic Differential Locking system for great traction but a diff lock button is still available for those really sticky situations. An Off-Road button can be selected for hardcore terrains and this allows for features like hill descent control to be activated and other nifty features such as off-road ABS as well.
If your Amarok is equipped with ESC, you get a feature called Electronic Trailer Stabilisation which assists when loss of traction occurs whilst towing. Speaking of towing, you’re good for 3300kg, which is great especially for those who enjoy a spot of caravanning. Depending on which Amarok you get, there is the choice of a 6 speed manual gearbox for the 103kW and the 132kW, but the V6 is only offered with the 8 speed automatic gearbox and only in 4Motion as well. The 2.0 TDI’s can be opted as RWD or 4Motion, with the 4Motion being the best off road choice, as it uses a Haldex system to utilise all four wheels for better traction.

Best bakkie out there?

Answering that question with a yes or no depends on your needs. As a lifestyle bakkie for the city and open road, the Amarok has always been a leader when it comes to comfort and trim levels. For the real hardcore off-roaders, some still prefer the likes of a Toyota Hilux. You can’t blame them because there are very few bad bakkies out there. The addition of the V6 engine has made the Amarok the best bakkie in terms of its powertrain. The new Nissan Navara still has one of the best chassis out there but again, it’s all subjective. The biggest problem facing bakkies today is cost and the Amarok V6 is not cheap. Nor is any other top of the range pick up either. An asking price of R748 600 for the Extreme is a hard pill to swallow. If it makes you sleep better at night, think of these fancy bakkies this way: if you own one of them, you don’t really need an SUV anymore. You have all the creature comforts of an SUV but the off road attributes of a bakkie, giving you a car you can do more with. Who would’ve thought that one day this segment would be so demanding? The fact that Volkswagen actually went ahead with the development of this car proves that if people complain enough, eventually they get what they want.

 

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Will the Volkswagen Citi Vivo Be A Future Classic?

It’s funny how things work. One moment everybody has a Citi Golf, the next moment an enthusiast will battle to find some original examples. By “original example” I don’t mean any random Citi Golf as you can easily locate one on most classified websites. I’m referring to the legendary Citi Golfs that donned the red, yellow and blue paintwork, the same one your parents used to have (probably). Growing up I saw many examples of these but now the one’s you find are generally in remote towns owned by people who won’t let them go. Which brings us to the somewhat reincarnation of this car. Yes Volkswagen want to pull on some South African heart strings by introducing a Citi Vivo, the same concept of the Citi Golf but just in a Vivo.

Like the Citi Golf, the Vivo is a car that is everywhere in South Africa, no matter where you are. So much so, they’ve been sort after cars by “baddies” for a very long time. The Citi Vivo is based on the 1.4 55kW variant and it will have some white wheels to match the white mirrors on the car, similar to how the Golf’s were dolled up decades ago. Again like the Golf, you can get it in red, yellow and blue. The question is then, will this Vivo be a car we’ll battle to find in the next few decades? This may sound silly but with only 2000 units being planned by VWSA, there won’t be too many around to begin with. What most South Africans loved about the Citi Golf was how simple the car was and how easy it is to maintain. The Polo Vivo will be seen in the same light in a few decades, especially considering how complex entry level cars are becoming. Who knows, but maybe one day the Citi Vivo will be the retro hatchback we’ll look at and think “those were good times”, like how people in their 40’s look at Cape Town hipsters who drive Citi Golfs now.

Personally I think the Citi Vivo is a very cool throwback at how awesome South African car culture is. Our buying nature has for a long time forced the likes of VW to make something special for us. It’s cool because we don’t merely see cars as a means of transport, we see them as our identity. How better to show people that you’re young wild and free through a brightly coloured car with white wheels? My advice to potential Citi Vivo owners? Keep the car, you may have something super cool to pass down to your kids one day.

The New VW Caddy: Test Driven

As we were driving through the Valley of a thousand hills on a beautiful Durban morning, the road ahead swept and as we turned the corner, we noticed the green lush scenery swooshing by.  As we turned into another corner and applied some power, “this Caddy is fun!” we thought. Sorry what, a Volkswagen Caddy being fun? Yes, you read correctly.  It’s not the kind of vehicle you would imagine having fun in on the road, but the Caddy 4 took us by surprise.

Our test run of this vehicle started at King Shaka International Airport with our destination being deep in the Natal Midlands, a beautiful countryside area with some of the best scenery in the country. It’s the type of place you would imagine enjoying a hot hatch or sports car on, due to its twisty roads. The VW Caddy, though, was also very enjoyable. We drove two Caddy’s, the first being a manual 81kW 2.0TDI. Let’s be honest, 81kW is not much power but that  being said, the Caddy 4 did not feel underpowered at all, mainly due to the torque from the turbocharger.

The VW caddy 4 comes under the commercial vehicle range, but it doesn’t really feel like a commercial vehicle. For starters, the interior is clean and crisp, extremely spacious and stylish. The steering wheel felt and looked like something you would find in a passenger car. Most noticeably the large infotainment system finished things off nicely, a very nice cabin indeed.When it comes to handling, one can turn in quickly into a corner and you don’t end up with a heap of body roll. This vehicle has the capacity of carrying eight people and considering all of that, one wouldn’t expect it to handle very well, but it does a good job. The car took the Midlands’ sweeping bends in its stride, it’s safe to say that this is not a boring commercial vehicle at all. Heading back to Durban the following day after a fantastic evening, we had the chance to drive the other more powerful automatic 2.0 TDI. The manual vehicle was good, but we wouldn’t recommend it over the 103kW DSG variant.  The extra 21kW really makes a difference, when cruising and overtaking it gets up to speed that much  faster, making for an easier and more comfortable drive. The DSG gearbox is smooth and precise, sport mode was also perfect for the windy route. You will have to part with an extra R40K for the DSG gearbox, but it’s definitely worth it.

At the end of the day, this is a commercial vehicle and one sees that due to how Volkswagen have made it incredibly easy to remove all the rear seats. A simple pull on a lever and the whole seat system slides out, fantastic if you need to load equipment or you’re going away for the weekend. Adding to the versatility is the option of either a tailgate or twin doors, each come with their own advantages and based on user preferences. The Caddy 4 also features some nifty technology systems, such as driver fatigue systems, reversing camera, advanced infotainment, and our favourite, anti-collision braking. This is a system which applies full braking power after the vehicle has been in an accident, which helps eliminate the chance of a secondary collision. There are various models of  the Caddy ranging from a stripped-down panel-van and Crew bus aimed at the commercial market to the Trendline and Alltrack aimed at the more private user. Longer wheelbase Maxi versions are also available which differentiate themselves by adding a generous 469mm of length.

Overall we enjoyed our experience with new Volkswagen Caddy, we were pleasantly surprised with the comfort levels in the car. The exterior looks fantastic and it really wouldn’t look out of place sitting next to passenger Volkswagens which are more sporty. It looks more like a sibling rather than an ugly cousin and fits into the entire range well. It’s also worth noting that VW South Africa have not been affected by the emissions saga at all so don’t let that discourage you from buying a diesel. The panel vans start at the R230 000 mark, crew buses come in at a similar starting price of R226 000 while the Trendline and Alltrack will cost you around R350 000 depending on specification.