Category: Audi

New Audi RS3 Hatch and Sedan Specs and Pricing

New Audi RS3

New Audi RS3 Specs and Pricing for South Africa

If there’s one thing that almost all car people can agree on, it’s that the hot-hatch is a brilliant invention. Take one practical family hatchback, add some poke, some coloured stitching here and a useless spoiler there and voila – you have the most sensible iteration of a performance car.

Then Audi comes along, and in true Vorsprung fashion, rewrites the rule book from cover to cover. The Audi RS2 was the original Super Hatch/wagon and in many ways, the spiritual successor to the RS3 with its gurgling 5-pot and grippy all-wheel-drive system. Now, if you have never experienced this exceptional recipe, you can be guaranteed to drop an expletive or two when you launch and Audi RS hatch for the first time. The acceleration is just brutal and luckily that fact remains with the facelifted RS3 and new-to-the-range RS3 Sedan. That’s right, you can now have a super-hot sedan version of the hatch.

Enquire about the new and used Audi vehicles at Audi Centurion here!

New Audi RS3 Sedan

Some visual tweaks here and there can be noticed but the biggest change is the additional 24 kW/15 N.m and massive 26 kg weight loss, thanks to major internal changes within the fabled 2.5-litre TFSI unit such as smaller crankshaft bearings and a hollow bored crankshaft. This should go a long way to improve the dynamics of the RS3 which was always considerably more understeery than its competitors, the BMW M2, Mercedes-AMG A45 and the Ford Focus RS.

Audi’s brilliant Virtual Cockpit instrument binnacle is now available with slightly modified gamification for the RS models, shifting the rev-counter to the middle of the display. LED headlights and taillights are now standard for both the Sportback and Sedan.

New Audi RS3

New Audi RS3 Pricing in South Africa

The New Audi RS3 Sedan is already available at all Audi Sport dealerships in South Africa and the RS3 Sportback will be arriving on our shores in November with both models coming standard with Audi’s 5 year/100 000km Freeway Plan.

Audi RS3 Sportback: R895 500
Audi RS3 Sedan: R925 500

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We drive the new Audi Q5 & SQ5

Audi SQ5

New Audi Q5 & SQ5 Driven

I realise that I speak a lot about Sci-fi here but it’s for good reason. In my opinion, Sci-fi and in specific, its movies, give us snippets as to how life will be in the not too distant future. If you have watched the movie iRobot, you will know what I’m talking about. You see, in this movie, the hero (real life hero to yours truly) drives the fanciest Audi that drives itself, has a brain of its own and makes you want to jump thirty years into the future to sample the latest and greatest. The all-new Audi Q5 is a snippet of that future. An evolution rather than revolution in terms of design, this vehicle brings the latest in tech and design to Audi’s midsize SUV.

Audi Q5

When we landed in Cape Town, we were greeted by the typical June weather with a hint of sun here and there. After a short while at Cape Town International Airport, we headed for the picturesque Gansbaai in the Western Cape. The first vehicle we were acquainted with was the Q5 2.0 TFSI, producing 185 kW and 370 N.m from its petrol motor it seemed very eager to show off its new-found muscle from the Vorsprung gym. The cabin is nothing short of “Audi Spec” and showcases Audi’s continued strides in terms of build quality and materials used. Its simply sublime.

Enquire about the new Audi Q5 and book a test drive at Audi Centurion here!

Audi Q5

Carving our way through a grey and drizzle soaked Cape, as passenger, I decided to start playing with all the new toys and gimmicks. The new MMI system, still a bit confusing with the trackpad, makes the iRobot dream come alive-ish. What I keep on going on about is the cabin and the quality thereof. There is no doubt that you feel like you have achieved in life, surrounded by this well-kept launch spec cabin. The extras adorned on the TFSI model were many, but not enough to warrant a second mortgage on your home.

Audi Q5

The navigation system, which is married to the virtual cockpit, makes you fall in love. The directions are shown to you at binnacle height and the LED display is crisp, clear and doesn’t tire the eyes. I would have liked a change in colour scheme to suit the different driving modes, being Eco, Normal, Dynamic and Individual. Yes, I’m that guy!

Audi Q5

Halfway to the overnight destination, I found myself in the driver’s seat of the 2.0 TDI variant with 140 kW and a very healthy wave of torque to the tune of 400 N.m. Pair this to the famous Franschoek Pass and it makes for an entertaining drive. Steering, although too light for my taste, provides good communication as to what inputs the front axle needs when you first start throwing the Audi Q5 from apex to apex. The steering rack does feel very quick but you soon learn to modulate your inputs to place the vehicle where you want. To be very honest, this vehicle will never, with it’s natural driver such as the interior designer from Sandton or the Private Wealth Manager from Investec, throw it from mid S bend to apex like I did, but we needed to see what this new Quattro system is all about. This has changed considerably from the old system. While the old system was configured to be on the whole time, this system goes with the less is more option. What the new system does, called “Quattro on Demand”, is de-couple the rear axle when not in need and within 200 milliseconds, full Quattro can be activated which will give the familiar on rails feeling of yesteryear. Lean on the chassis and yes, it will understeer, as Audi have built this vehicle for the discerning driver and not for the “extract every split second” racing driver. We got to our overnight hotel, the Grootbos Private Nature Reserve, and the Q5 was well at home on the make shift rally circuit being the odd four kilometers of gravel, stones and mud. The vehicle felt very sure footed at speeds that would make the late Colin McRae proud and my co-driver sick to the stomach.

Audi SQ5

The next morning, nursing a post 30’s red wine headache courtesy of the kind Audi staff, I was let loose in the range topping SQ5. This vehicle is definitely built for the sportier wealth manager and thankfully, this variant sports a mighty 3.0 V6 TFSI Turbo petrol motor. The reason for Audi SA’s decision is simple. There is currently no diesel version of this vehicle so the Petrol will have to do. From start up, the silky-smooth motor, delivering 260 kW and 500 N.m, makes itself known and purrs away beckoning to be let loose through the rev range. The make shift rally track, now done in reverse direction, gave insight to the new dynamic direction that Audi is focused on. An oversteering Audi? Surely that wine wasn’t that good? It wasn’t, and the new steering from the rear was from the reworked Quattro System. See, for the SQ5, the Quattro is not the same but rather has a rear bias under normal driving and when driven enthusiastically, will call in the help of the front axle and even braking the inside wheels due to some clever electronic wizardry. Turn in is crisp, body roll is at a minimum and ride comfort is sublime thanks to the 45 profile tyres. This seems like a car to drop the kids off and take the back routes to work just for the sake of driving those few extra kilometers.

I handed over the SQ5 to my co-driver very reluctantly, and had to play DJ. This wasn’t the worst job to have as this SQ5 had the optional Bang & Olufsen sound system among some of the toys already mentioned.

Overall, the New Audi Q5 is a force to be reckoned with. Yes, its styling might not be wild or as provocative as we would have liked but look at the whole package and you can forgive the “facelift” appearance. The SQ5 left an impression on me though, and I would love to see what it will do against its natural rivals, the Mercedes GLC 43 and the upcoming BMW X3 M40i. The school run King. Who will take the crown? Bring on the Sci-Fi future.

Audi Q5 Pricing in South Africa

Q5 2.0 TDI Quattro S Tronic: R698,000

Q5 2.0 TDI Quattro S Tronic Sport: R748,000

Q5 2.0 TFSI Quattro S Tronic: R747,500

Q5 2.0 TFSI Quattro S Tronic Sport: R797,500

SQ5 3.0 TFSI Quattro Tiptronic: R1,044,000

 

Enquire about the new Audi Q5 and book a test drive at Audi Centurion here!

 

More Innovation than an S-Class? All-New Audi A8 Released

Audi A8

New Audi A8 Released

Audi A8

Rewind to the advent of the big, luxury saloon and copious amounts of expensive and shiny or woody materials was the order of the day. With more chrome than Brakpan and more wood than Hot House, you certainly knew who was boss, riding in the back of his supercharged Mercedes-Benz or winged Cadillac. The focus then shifted to turning the back of your mini-limo into a mirror image of your lounge, not the greatest idea in the velour-crazed 70’s where brown was considered to be chic. Sies. Say what you will, however, because despite the questionable taste and thirsty engines required to lug your lounge around, the segment continued to soldier on with executives flocking like sheep to the voluptuous comfort of their S-Classes, 7-Series’, LS’ and later on, Audi A8’s.

The S-Class was always the king of CoriCraft in your car, with a good smattering of safety and innovation to remain current, but it would seem, in recent years, that Audi has now taken the baton from Mercedes-Benz in the innovation race, with the segment now overtaking your living room as a whole, exhibiting more technology than you will ever need in the comfort of your home.

Take the previous generation Audi A8, for example, while it may have looked like an elongated A4, it was one of the first cars to feature a high-speed fibre-optic data network connecting multiple data processors and was also the first vehicle top feature a static adaptive front lighting system – in 2002! It also featured fingerprint recognition, snazzy pop-up B&O speakers in the dash and received adaptive cruise control in 2007. And if that wasn’t enough for you, you could even have it with a Lamborghini derived all-aluminium V10 in the form of the Audi S8.

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Audi A8
The current generation features noise cancelling in the cabin, which obviously wowed the world, so if that was anything to go by, the all-new Audi A8, unveiled today at the Audi Summit, will take the fight straight to its competitors with some serious tech. We actually know this, already, with Audi saying that this new (D5) generation features artificial intelligence and is the first production car in the world to have been developed for “highly automated driving.” It also has matrix reading lights. Yes, you read that correctly – you can adjust the brightness, size and position of your reading light in the rear seat!

Audi A8

Another first for Audi, the new A8 features Audi AI active suspension which works in a similar way to Mercedes-Benz’s ABC (Active Body Control) making use of a forward facing camera to read the road ahead before increasing or reducing the load individually on all four of the wheels. In the event of a side impact, this system is also able to raise the body on the side of the impact by up to 80 mm within 0.5 seconds, thus exposing an even more resistant part of the body to the impact zone, clever…

Other notable features include Audi’s 48 v electrical system across the range – making all derivatives “mild hybrids”, capable of coasting along without the use of the combustion engine for up to 40 km. – active noise cancellation, 4-wheel steering and one of the most advanced lighting systems ever seen on a motor vehicle.

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Audi A8

Powering the Audi A8 is a range of 6 powertrains, two 3.0-litre motors, a TDI (210 kW) and TFSI (250 kW), two 4.0-litre units, a TDI (320 kW) and TFSI (338 kW), a twin-turbocharged W12 unit in the A8 L (430 kW) and a plug-in-hybrid featuring the 3.0-litre TFSI unit and an electric motor, integrated into the gearbox with its own clutch, which produce a combined 330 kW and 700 N.m.

Audi A8

Audi A8 Pricing in South Africa


With no word yet on which derivatives we’ll be receiving, expect to see the all-new Audi A8 on South African roads within the next year or so with pricing likely to start just below R2 000 000.

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

Audi A5/S5 Convertible Launched.

Audi A5/S5 Convertible

The new Audi A5/S5 has been on sale in South Africa for a couple of months now and as is always the case, the convertible has now joined the Sportback and Coupé to complete the suave and swoopy A5/S5 range. Now featuring an “acoustic” roof that opens in a brisk 15 seconds and closes in a zippy 18 seconds up to 50 km/h, it features a single “one touch” operating which is great if you’re the kind of person who hates holding down a button for 15 seconds. 

Audi A5/S5 Convertible

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Carrying across the design cues of the Audi A5/S5 Coupé and Sportback, the Convertible also features the striking and bold ‘tornado line’ which featured on the previous generation A5/S5, but has now been accentuated create and even more striking side profile.

With an updated five-link suspension up front and a new five-link rear construction replacing the trapezoidal-link suspension used on the previous A5/S5, this new convertible promises to deliver handling in line with its dynamic looks.

Audi A5/S5 Convertible

The A5/S5 Convertible’s body is both lighter and torsionally stiffer than before, reducing scuttle shake and maximising other safety measures during an impact.

Two 2.0-litre petrol power units will be on offer initially, delivering 140 kW and 185 kW through the front wheels and all four wheels, respectively.  A 2.0-litre diesel motor will join the market at a later stage. 

With 260 kW and 500 N.m, the S5 convertible will hurtle itself towards the horizon with impressive pace, sprinting from 0-100 km/h in just 5.1 seconds. Thanks in part to the weight saving, quattro all-wheel drive and ZF’s sublime eight-speed automatic gearbox are also to thank here and are mated superbly to the S5’s silky smooth 3.0-litre turbocharged V6 engine.

Audi A5/S5 Convertible

Interestingly, microphones are now integrated into the front seatbelts which improves voice quality during phone call or when trying to use voice recognition, even with the roof down.

As one can expect from Audi, the usual array of safety aids come as standard across the range, including EBD and Audi pre sense City which monitors both pedestrians and other road users and initiates emergency braking if necessary.

Audi A5/S5 Convertible

Audi A5/S5 Convertible Pricing in South Africa

The Audi A5/S5 Convertible goes on sale in South Africa in July and pricing starts at R689 000 for the A5 Convertible 2.0 TFSI (140 kW) with the range-topping S5 Convertible costing R1 028 000 with Audi’s 5 year/100 000 km Freeway Plan featuring as standard across the board.

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The Audi Q2 is expensive, but it’s worth it.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Audi Q2 Driven Review

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Unique and distinguished are words I would use when talking about Audi’s latest Q-Model. It’s obviously not a supercar, but still possibly turns as many heads due to its individual hexagonal style based on Audi’s new design language.  The Audi Q2 can’t really be faulted, then, in terms of design because this individual style looks pretty good. Many road users want a vehicle that is unique, and offers a little spice to stand out – luckily for them, the Q2 to offers just that.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

This car has received quite a bit of stick in other departments though, with one of those being value for money. What makes a buyer choose the Q2 over other vehicles on the road? That is a very difficult question to answer.

One thing the Audi doesn’t fall short on is drive quality. At the end of the day, no matter how big or small or hexagonal it is, it’s built by Audi and drives like one too. The cabin is quiet and comfortable and the 1.4 TFSI engine can muster excitement at times with 110 kW while also being remarkably smooth, especially when paired to the 7-speed S-Tronic gearbox.

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Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Build quality is something the Audi Q2 does not fall short on either, this is seen not only through driving but also the everyday use of the vehicle. With regards to the interior, one will find a clean and sophisticated appearance in the usual Audi format. The only let down here is the door cards, they look and feel cheap, but not only that, they are also very plain. An oversight in the quality department that’s for sure.

The big elephant in the room with this car is price, and this is the only real downside to the Audi Q2. A base Audi Q2 with a 1.0 TFSI engine and manual gearbox will set you back R460 000 at the least. The model I tested with the 1.4 TFSI engine enters the market at R529 500, with my test car sitting at just over R568 000 thanks to four optional extras.

Is this car overpriced? Yes and No. The Audi Q2 is overpriced for the market that the Q2 is supposedly aimed at – the younger driver. Now in Europe and other parts of the world, this could very well work, younger people earn better and have much better financing deals at their disposal. Unfortunately, this is not the case in South Africa, so is this respect, it is overpriced.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

On the other hand and with all things taken into consideration such as build quality, ride comfort and interior and exterior design, the Audi Q2 is well worth its price tag. For me, the Q2 is a premium crossover vehicle, one only needs to see the optional extras list with items such as Audi’s Pilot assist, for example.

Personally, I feel the Audi Q2 attracts attention from a similar market to the Q3. It has a very soccer mom type feel and it’s a very nice option when nipping to the shops or getting the kids from school, for those who can afford it.

A buyer on a budget looking for the best deal won’t buy this car, but a buyer looking for a daily run around without much concern for any kind of budget will head straight to the Audi showroom and purchase a Q2, and they will have a very nice car indeed.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Alternatives to the Audi Q2

Mazda CX-3 – The Mazda CX-3 shares many similarities to the Audi Q2 with one of them being a unique and edgy design. It’s a very nice drive although the powertrain is not as rewarding, but it also features a pretty decent interior too.

Audi Q3 A slightly bigger but also slightly more boring version on the Audi Q2. It has more space and is definitely more family orientated. The starting price is just over R470,000. For R578,000 there is a 2.0 TFSI powertrain on offer with 132kW – That’s just R10k more than our Audi Q2 test car.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Pricing for the Audi Q2 in South Africa:

Audi Q2 1.0 TFSI – R464 500

Audi Q2 1.0 TFSI S Tronic – R483 000

Audi Q2 1.4 TFSI – R511 000

Audi Q2 1.4 TFSI  S Tronic – R529 500

Audi Q2 2.0 TDI – R565 000

 

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

The B7 Audi RS4 – The more door, Quattro V8 racer?

B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

The B7 Audi RS4 – Driven

The era of analogue, man and machine connections has become a rather rare occurrence in modern automotive machinery. Electronic nannies seek to tame the wave of kW’s that even the most unassuming of ‘fast’ cars now have. Me being a rather backwards human frankly, I loved this era, the sheer amount of fear that these cars were able to place in there pilots, but more to the point, they highlighted the greater need for driver skill and the size of the man meat that was needed when pressing on.

 

B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

Now, being a rather primitive being, that was automotive nirvana and replication of this sensation is a constant feature in my motoring escapades. Enter the B7 Audi RS4, an 11-year old, 4 door saloon with three pedals protruding from the firewall and a stonking good 4.2 Litre V8, mated to the grippy AWD Quattro drivetrain. From the exterior, highly unassuming, with only large oval-shaped exhausts to suggest any sporting prowess. In its prime, good for a 4.6 second 0-100 sprint and despite the “Big Three’s” 250km/h handshake, would only run out of puff at around 266km/h. This arguably was a drive I had lusted after for since its conception and frankly, in the cold month of June, brought an awkward bout of the chesties.

Climbing into the cabin, one is instantly groped by the enormous Recaro leather buckets, as the busyness of the cabin hints as to the progress that interior design has come.  Design and fascia are high quality, even by today’s standards, and feels well put together but ultimately still very much a button-heavy setup. The biggest and shiniest of these being most important,  as I quickly identified the centre console mounted Start/Stop button.  A quick stab at this lets lose to a deep and burly roar, as the Audi comes to life. The steering wheel, with its perforated leather and flat bottom aluminium accents, feels meaty to hand and hints as to the capability that the brute beholds.

B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

Driving

On the move, the V8 soundtrack is rather invigorating, even at low speeds, and yet seems to only get better as you chase the stratospheric redline at 8 200 rpm. The cruising ability is ever apparent as you can potter around rather easily. With 430 N.m on tap, 90% of which is delivered from 2 250 to 7 600 rpm, the in-gear pulling power is immense and lofting around town proved effortless. This was not the focus of the RS4, however. It’s not a city run-around but a raging brute, onwards, in pursuit of the perfect driving road which was soon on the agenda. A short drive out of the hustle and bustle of the city and the R563 between Hekpoort and Krugersdorp comes into sight, a short 9.3 km stretch of tarmac that provides for some decent fun.  No Sport modes and dynamic setting trickery here, just a poke at the traction control button, a drop at the cogs and the smiles begin. The V8 is truly ridiculous. It sounds so damn good as it pushes you on vicariously, as you don the façade of a Tiff Needell or a Chris Harris. The Gearbox is slick and slides through the ratios at the greatest of ease, with a short throw and this invigoration that makes you feel rather good. The pedal placement is perfect with hell-toe shifts being ever so easy, the V8 caterwaul from the exhausts coaxing more exuberance with the throttle.

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B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

When shown some corners, the AWD system on the B7 Audi RS4 does a very good job of keeping things under control, with it being almost idiot proof when jumping on the gas existing corners. A light controlled understeer tone envelopes the driving experience, that keeps you from pushing too hard into the corners but this never seems to kill the fun, it’s almost a warning of impending doom. Only when being stupid does the front let go all together but even still in such a slow and controlled motion, it allows for plenty of time to regain composure before kissing the guardrail.

 

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Khanye Ngwenya 

Junior Writer

Rich Kids Club – Audi Q2 Review

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Audi Q2 Driven Review

If the Q2 was a person, it would be ‘that guy’.. You all know that guy and if not, you are that guy. The guy who has a sneaker option for everyday. The guy who has all the latest music on his latest mobile device. The guy with the latest car, you know this guy. He is the guy that is uber annoying, yet, is kinda liked and secretly, you want to be that guy. The millennial who has wealthy parents who have made sure that he will go through life on his yacht down-stream.

That was the first impression of the Audi Q2. It left me wondering that, if a crossover SUV with a 1.4 TFSI motor and DSG with all of the cool extras costs R778 000, what I’m a doing with my life in general and where can I apply for a re-do? You see, the Q2 is one of those trendy cars that are, as it’s known in the African Culture as “for control”. This isn’t a “we have a baby now, let’s be wise and get a spacious vehicle”. No, this is a “we need an extra car that the kids will use as I don’t want them driving any of our cars as I don’t trust them, and the Q2 is safe enough”. You see, “for control”. Being based on the A3, it’s not the biggest compact SUV and its closest competitor is the new Mini Countryman which has a more palatable price, relatively speaking.

So, what do you get for the price of both kidneys and your right lung? You get, as per our test car; Bang and Olfusen sound, Navigation, Panorama Sunroof, LED headlights with daytime running lights, sweeping indicators, fancy Tron/iRobot lighting on the dashboard as well as the awesome Virtual Cockpit. The list goes on. All of this does suggest that if you scale back on the optional extras, you can end up with an affordable Q2. It’s still one that went to a semi-private school and speaks to its grandparents in English, as it doesn’t speak any vernacular. The car does drive very well and it feels very modern and chic. Audi never gets interiors wrong and they weren’t about to start on this one. We need to make special mention of the Apple CarPlay feature.It’s something that works stupendously well and it’s nearly impossible to fault. From voice commands, to the navigation and music outlay, it’s near perfect. I sincerely hope that other manufacturers can look at this example and take note on how to use systems like this that integrate so well with a mobile device.

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I will nit-pick and point out that the car has a “dead spot” on take off. This was remedied by adjusting the vehicle’s throttle response to Dynamic instead of Comfort via the Drive Select module. As much as it worked, I would have liked a bit more poke from the turbocharged four-pot. The S-Tronic gearbox works like a hot knife on butter once it’s out of the first gate. The steering is also positive and does communicate well, especially in Dynamic mode. Overall the car works well on the city and on the open road.

So our week went well in the latest and trendiest Audi. We did get a wave in Hyde Park from a fellow Q2 driver who came out of a home that literally took up half of the block. That’s quite the indicator as to who this car will appeal to. Perhaps it may have the Range Rover Evoque appeal? Truth be told, it’s a nice little car and it has all the modern gizmos to keep you entertained. One can imagine some money will be taken out of various trust funds to buy this car.

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

New Audi R8 Spyder – Now you can hear your V10 scream better.

New Audi R8 Spyder V10

New Audi R8 Spyder V10 released in South Africa

Let’s be honest, as much as pure petrol heads lament the lack of rigidity in a convertible, the look and feel of a drop top is badass. This is especially the case when it comes to supercars. The Audi R8 is already a fantastic vehicle, offering ridiculous performance figures and an amazing soundtrack. This soundtrack will be even more audible now that the New Audi R8 Spyder gives you the choice of driving around without a roof.

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The same V10 engine we’ve come to know and love has been used, featuring 397kW and 540N.m. This figure may seem strange because more press has been given to the R8 Plus model, which has 445kW. The Spyder however pushes out the exact same power as the non – Plus variant, but we’re sure Audi will make a Plus available at some point. That being said the car now dashes to 100km/h in 3.6 seconds which is still a monumental time considering that the Spyder variant will be heavier than the coupe. Heavier doesn’t mean heavier though as the new R8 Spyder uses technology called Audi Space Frame. This a multi-material frame that combines aluminium and Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic. The convertible top also only weighs in at 44kgs, so a lot has been done to keep the car light on its feet, ensuring dynamic handling characteristics.

Another thing many people have enjoyed about the R8 is the way the Quattro system works. Unlike other four wheel drive systems, it’s less prone to nose diving provided you give it the respect it deserves coming into corners. In fact the system in the New Audi R8  Spyder can send up to 100 percent of its power to the rear wheels, depending on the situation. Whilst most people won’t exploit their R8’s to this point, it’s good to know that fun can be had for those who’ve watched too much Top Gear.

 

Besides the lack of a roof, the R8 remains mostly the same – just much better looking. The car comes standard with a host of technology such as Navigation, Virtual Cockpit and front and rear LED lights. Although, you do expect those kind of creature comforts if you’re paying approximately R2.9million for a car. We love it’s look, we love how it sounds, now it’s a matter of seeing if we love how it drives. Judging by the coupe, it should be very exciting.

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

A futuristic machine : New Audi A5 Driven Review

New Audi A5 Driven Review

As journalists, we drive a fair number of new cars and because of this, I feel that sometimes we become a little numb to the latest technology and gadgets that are found in vehicles today. I realised this while driving the new Audi A5 on test when some friends of mine lost their minds at how this hot coupé had a little mechanism which passed the seatbelt to the front occupants, something that’s been around for over a decade in premium coupés.

2017 Audi A5 South Africa

If that got them excited, you should’ve seen their faces while giving them a demonstration of Audi’s Virtual Cockpit. At this point the new A5 could have started to hover and they would not have been surprised.

There are no “slow” versions of the Audi A5, I can confirm this having previously driven all if the variants in the range on the South African launch. On my week long test, I had the very pleasing 140 kW petrol motor, we could call this the “entry level” model, but it is by no means an entry level car.

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2017 Audi A5 South Africa

The new A5 gives of a very sporty and dynamic presence and this is accentuated when  entering the cabin. It is very driver focused, very intense and you feel like you are jumping into the cockpit of a futuristic machine rather than a vehicle which takes you from A to B.

There are many features I enjoy about the interior, from the optional Virtual Cockpit to the large square drive selector which fits nicely in the palm of the hand. If you are familiar with the previous A5, you will notice the new long streamlined dash which gives of a feeling of more space inside the cabin. Audi definitely designs some of the best interiors around and it gets better at night – opening the door reveals a glow of lights from various locations.This gets better when the ignition is started and a mix of red and blue fills the interior, followed by the drivers selected colour preference. Visually it’s fairly fantastic.

The new A5 delivers then in the design and visual elements, but does the driving experience match the pretty lights?

I have to say, it really does. 140 kW and 320 N.m means that this car is no slouch, it accelerates nicely, although you won’t be running with Golf GTI’s from a standstill. Mid range power and torque is also delivered smoothly, overtaking and the like is a breeze and there really is ample power for the daily commuter.  A decent engine tone even comes into play when you “give it some” as we say in England.

2017 Audi A5 South Africa

This 2.0-litre variant is definitely the most easy going out of the bunch but, if you want more of  a hair catching fire type of vehicle then one must look at opting for the 180 kW 2.0-litre Quattro or even the glorious sounding S5. The former provides the same comfort and experience but with that little extra grunt. If performance is not high in your priorities and you just love the look, feel and drive of the new Audi A5 then the 140 kW option a very good option to go for.

In terms of pricing, the new Audi A5 has a list price of R623 000 and when specced, can be as high as R795 000 like my test vehicle. Options like the S-line package, Audi Virtual Cockpit, Electric front memory seats and LED headlights are a must but there are options one could do without. This might sound like an expensive vehicle but a BMW 420i which produces a very similar power output and specced to the same level comes in at R770,000.

The difference here is that Audi charge R10k for automatic A/C whereas as on the BMW it comes as standard. Audi also offer Carplay and Android Auto for R5 000 whereas BMW believe their infotainment system is good enough. Audi’s Virtual Cockpit is also much more advanced than BMW’s optional Multi-functional instrument display but it is also quite a bit more expensive.

At this level of pricing there really isn’t much in it and from a driving perspective it’s really down to what you prefer. Audi have done a great job with the new A5 and if you decide to go this route you will be a very happy driver indeed.

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

The Future Is Electric: Audi E-Tron Sportback Revealed

Audi is starting to take electricity very seriously: Audi E-Tron Sportback revealed.

Manufacturers fascination with electricity was not just a phase, it’s happening and getting better and better. So much so Audi plans to launch five electric cars in the next five years. Yikes. The one everyone is talking about now is the Audi E-Tron Sportback, a sleek looking electric crossover of sorts. We know concept cars rarely look the same when going into production but Audi has surprised us before. The R8 for instance looks a great deal like the concept car it came from. If that’s going to be the case with the E-Tron Sportback, we’ll be in for a visual treat. The car looks very space age, almost like the it came out the movie Tron.

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It will be powered by a 95kWh battery with a predicted range of approximately 500km. So imagine being able to make it to Pietermaritzburg in your E-Tron Sportback? The trip won’t be a boring one too as the car will be able to do 0-100km/h in 4.5 seconds. That’s properly quick for a car that’s going to be silent, or any car for that matter. Of course the main target market for a car like this in China, as electric cars are booming that side. For us South Africans however we may wait a while until this car comes our side. Thankfully the likes of BMW and Nissan have paved the way, so by the time fully electric Audi’s come this side we may have the infrastructure we need.  

 

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!