Month: June 2017

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8 – The most powerful Jag Ever!

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8 

Jaguar Land Rover Special Vehicle Operations, not only sounds like a special task force but also have the inherent ability to create ludicrously fast and loud versions of JLR cars. Their acumen has now been applied to the XE sedan to create the Jaguar XE SV Project 8. Making its debut at the Goodwood Festival of Speed on the 30th of June, the Project 8 will position itself as their most brawny big cat to date. Powering the XE is the thunderous 5.0-litre V8 we’ve seen in other hot JLR products, but with extra gusto to the tune of 441 kW and 700 N.m. The numbers suggest serious contention to the title of the fastest super saloon with a 3.7 second 0-100 sprint time and a supercar-rivalling 322km/h top speed.  Drive is to four corners with a dynamic AWD-system, driven by an 8-speed “quick shift” transmission.

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8

Externally the differences between this and the standard model are rather extensive, with the typical fast car perquisites checked off the list. These include the addition of a Titanium quad exhaust and manually adjusted boot spoiler for added aerodynamic downforce at the immense speeds the Project 8 is capable of. In the pursuit of weight saving, the use of carbon fibre is generous with a carbon bonnet, front and rear bumpers with passive air ducting to create downforce and aid in cooling.  Just 300 units will come to form and will be exclusively left-hand drive

 

Hardcore Track Pack

The optional track pack ditches niceties, like the standard Magnesium performance buckets for a set of lightweight carbon fibre front ones, saving 12.2kgs. This theme is carried on in the rear, with seats removed altogether and replaced with a harness retention hoop, in support of the 4-point safety harness. Other track specifications include a fire extinguisher system.

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8

 

Interior

The hardcore focus remains with the use of black Alcantara to line the instrument cluster in the aim of reducing reflection, so too are the door cards and steering wheel. A 12.3 inch TFT instrument screen provides as the information hub for driver data. An aluminium plaque will serve as a reminder as to the exclusive numbers showcasing “1 of 300”. The features list is extensive as one would expect from Jag, with a 10.2-inch tablet like infotainment centre, offering dual-view technology, a 4G wi-fi hotspot and InControl Remote app control connected to a 380W 11 speaker MeridianTM Sound System.  

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8

 

 

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8 Pricing in South Africa

Ahhh well, no allocation of units per country has been made but the base price in the UK suggests to £149,995 equivalent to R2.5 million in South Africa, but more importantly, we are a Right-hand drive country, so it’s very likely this will be exclusive to LHD markets.

JAGUAR XE SV PROJECT 8

Alternatives

The Project 8 is far dearer than all its rivals, but the serious numbers lead to rivals from the likes of the newly launched Mercedes-AMG E63S, the new BMW M5 and the now ageing RS6 Avant, because its quite a bit more mental than the M3, C63S and Giulia!

Aston takes the fight to Tesla with the Aston Martin RapidE

Aston Martin RapidE

Based on the RapidE AMR concept the, 5.9Litre V12 will give way to a new all-electric powertrain. The move is in line with Aston’s new strategic plan for the development of low and zero-emission vehicles. The RapidE will be a limited run model and continue the collaborative works of Aston and Williams Advanced Engineering, the same Williams responsible for the 7 Formula One vehicles their F1 cohorts share. The details regarding the powertrain will follow as production draws nearer, but given the nature of electric propulsion, the power will be instantaneous and pretty likely rather furious to the spine.  Just 155 of these 4- door, 4-seater RapidE’s will be built and production is set to begin in 2019.

Dr Andy Palmer, Aston Martin CEO, shared his thoughts on the RapidE: “Having unveiled the RapidE Concept back in October 2015 we reach another milestone with the confirmation that we are now putting the first all-electric Aston Martin into production. RapidE represents a sustainable future in which Aston Martin’s values of seductive style and supreme performance doesn’t merely co-exist alongside a new zero-emission powertrain, but are enhanced by it. The internal combustion engine has been at the heart of Aston Martin for more than a century and will continue to be for years to come. RapidE will showcase Aston Martin’s vision, desire and capability to successfully embrace radical change, delivering a new breed of car that stays true to our ethos and delights our customers.”     

Williams Advanced Engineering’s Technical Director, Paul McNamara, said: “Williams Advanced Engineering has always endeavoured to work collaboratively with its customers to meet their sustainability challenges and find energy efficient solutions. For today’s car manufacturers, this is particularly important as legislation demands more energy efficient vehicles. This project with Aston Martin will draw on the extensive battery and EV experience we have accumulated and we are extremely pleased to be supporting this prestigious British company with their future electrification strategy.”

Aston Martin RapidE Availability

The Aston Martin RapidE will hit the production lines in 2019. No word on what markets it will be sold in, but that gives us time enough to make sure we have the necessary infrastructure to support fully electric vehicles.

Khanye Ngwenya

 

The Audi Q2 is expensive, but it’s worth it.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Audi Q2 Driven Review

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Unique and distinguished are words I would use when talking about Audi’s latest Q-Model. It’s obviously not a supercar, but still possibly turns as many heads due to its individual hexagonal style based on Audi’s new design language.  The Audi Q2 can’t really be faulted, then, in terms of design because this individual style looks pretty good. Many road users want a vehicle that is unique, and offers a little spice to stand out – luckily for them, the Q2 to offers just that.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

This car has received quite a bit of stick in other departments though, with one of those being value for money. What makes a buyer choose the Q2 over other vehicles on the road? That is a very difficult question to answer.

One thing the Audi doesn’t fall short on is drive quality. At the end of the day, no matter how big or small or hexagonal it is, it’s built by Audi and drives like one too. The cabin is quiet and comfortable and the 1.4 TFSI engine can muster excitement at times with 110 kW while also being remarkably smooth, especially when paired to the 7-speed S-Tronic gearbox.

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Build quality is something the Audi Q2 does not fall short on either, this is seen not only through driving but also the everyday use of the vehicle. With regards to the interior, one will find a clean and sophisticated appearance in the usual Audi format. The only let down here is the door cards, they look and feel cheap, but not only that, they are also very plain. An oversight in the quality department that’s for sure.

The big elephant in the room with this car is price, and this is the only real downside to the Audi Q2. A base Audi Q2 with a 1.0 TFSI engine and manual gearbox will set you back R460 000 at the least. The model I tested with the 1.4 TFSI engine enters the market at R529 500, with my test car sitting at just over R568 000 thanks to four optional extras.

Is this car overpriced? Yes and No. The Audi Q2 is overpriced for the market that the Q2 is supposedly aimed at – the younger driver. Now in Europe and other parts of the world, this could very well work, younger people earn better and have much better financing deals at their disposal. Unfortunately, this is not the case in South Africa, so is this respect, it is overpriced.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

On the other hand and with all things taken into consideration such as build quality, ride comfort and interior and exterior design, the Audi Q2 is well worth its price tag. For me, the Q2 is a premium crossover vehicle, one only needs to see the optional extras list with items such as Audi’s Pilot assist, for example.

Personally, I feel the Audi Q2 attracts attention from a similar market to the Q3. It has a very soccer mom type feel and it’s a very nice option when nipping to the shops or getting the kids from school, for those who can afford it.

A buyer on a budget looking for the best deal won’t buy this car, but a buyer looking for a daily run around without much concern for any kind of budget will head straight to the Audi showroom and purchase a Q2, and they will have a very nice car indeed.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Alternatives to the Audi Q2

Mazda CX-3 – The Mazda CX-3 shares many similarities to the Audi Q2 with one of them being a unique and edgy design. It’s a very nice drive although the powertrain is not as rewarding, but it also features a pretty decent interior too.

Audi Q3 A slightly bigger but also slightly more boring version on the Audi Q2. It has more space and is definitely more family orientated. The starting price is just over R470,000. For R578,000 there is a 2.0 TFSI powertrain on offer with 132kW – That’s just R10k more than our Audi Q2 test car.

Audi Q2 Review South Africa

Pricing for the Audi Q2 in South Africa:

Audi Q2 1.0 TFSI – R464 500

Audi Q2 1.0 TFSI S Tronic – R483 000

Audi Q2 1.4 TFSI – R511 000

Audi Q2 1.4 TFSI  S Tronic – R529 500

Audi Q2 2.0 TDI – R565 000

 

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

McLaren 570S Spider Released

McLaren 570S Spider

McLaren 570S Spider Launched

McLaren 570S Spider

The McLaren 570s was a car that set our hair on fire when we tested it late in 2016. It looked fantastic, it was shockingly fast, and driving inside the cabin really did give off that race car element. Frankly, we were very sad to see it go.

Stumbling on into the middle of  2017 and McLaren have released the convertible version of this beautiful monster, Dubbed the McLaren 570S Spider. Not much has changed regarding chassis and drivetrain, it still features 3.8-litre twin turbocharged V8, putting out lots and lots of kW’S – 420 of them to be exact. The McLaren 570S Spider also retains a carbon fibre MonoCell II chassis which brings a multitude of benefits such as a reduction in weight and strength. 

The biggest changes then, as you have probably guessed is the folding roof. This roof entirely disappears into the rear of the McLaren and can be operated at up to 40km/h and will fully open or close within 15 seconds. With the roof up, the 570s spider has around 50-litres of luggage space in the rear and 150-litres up front.

McLaren 570S Spider

Performance

The only other difference is that McLaran has included an extended rear spoiler to aid with aerodynamics.This helps to keep the 570s spider on the same performance levels as the Coupe variant. Talking of performance, the numbers all seem to be identical to the Coupe, the only change being the spider will take an extra 0.1 seconds to 200km/h. Thus which is probably because it is 58kg heavier. Top speed with the roof in place is 328km/h, this drops to 315km/h with the roof down.

McLaren 570S Spider

As I’m sure you are aware, there is a host of benefits to owning a convertible supercar. From windswept hair as you, your wife and your V8 thunder through the South African countryside to making your face more visible as you drive meticulously slowly down Camps Bay Drive. Either way, the McLaren 570S Spider remains a beautiful car.

I could not help but spec my own McLaren 570s Spider on the online configurator. Have a go at speccing yours here:                 Spec Your 570S Spider

McLaren 570S Spider

McLaren 570S Spider Pricing in South Africa

We have no news yet on pricing for the South African market, but we expect it to be around R3.5m – R4m.

 

 

 

 

 

Porsche has O.C.D : New Porsche Panamera 4S Driven.

Porsche Panamera 4s

We drive the new Porsche Panamera 4S.

Porsche Panamera 4s

The people at Porsche must suffer from an obsessive compulsive disorder. This ailment is to our benefit though, as their need for precision has created one of the most functional luxury cars available. Spending time in the new Porsche Panamera was an experience that marvelled us for various reasons we will explain.

The Looks:

It’s almost standard procedure in this segment to design a vehicle that expresses your monetary status in a somewhat brash way. If you look at what the Italians make for instance, it screams “look at me, I’m wealthy and my cousin Enzo is wealthy too.” The other German counterparts say “I’m in politics and my driver is on speed dial should the traffic get heavy.” Nothing is wrong with any of that, but for those who want to quietly go about their business in an understated manner, the Panamera ticks all the boxes. A few years ago, this model was the butt of many a joke. This new design, however, has shut the critics up in the same manner someone would,  after losing a considerable amount of weight and obtaining a new wardrobe. It’s a sleeker look, modernised and very “911-ish” which is quite the compliment.

Porsche Panamera 4s

The exterior, in my opinion, is appealing, yet the interior is simply marvellous. Sitting inside it feels like a technological cocoon of functionality and modernity. The simplest of things keep me pleased and one of those simple things offered in the Panamera first and foremost, is Apple CarPlay. The amount of near death experiences I’ve had whilst trying to pair a phone to a car are far too many to recount. With CarPlay, a simple plug into my device and I’m ready to live another day. The infotainment system on the Panamera is not just for picking tunes, but rather it is the hub for all things in the car. Media, Navigation, Vehicle Dynamics and even the air-conditioning is all customisable using the screen. If you want to keep the touch screen unit clean, you do have the option to use the touch-sensitive buttons around the gear shifter.

Porsche Panamera 4s

The rear of the Panamera is not aimed for the world’s tallest man and his three children, but rather two persons who will enjoy the individualised set-up. A secondary screen centralised for the rear occupants allows them to interact with navigation and media, as well as control certain features in the car. Overall a strong element of sportiness is embodied in the inside of the Panamera, something you don’t quite expect until you turn the switch and start the vehicle.

Porsche Panamera 4s

Driving the Porsche Panamera 4S

Previously, anything other than the turbo variant was not mind blowing in terms of performance in the Panamera range. The new Panamera however is a very deceiving vehicle as it uses a 2.9 litre Twin Turbo V6 which howls on start-up, giving you an idea that it can go fast. Only when you accelerate for the first time do you remember that the brochure did in fact tell you that this car produces 324kW and 550N.m, resulting in a 0-100km/h sprint of 4.2 seconds. This power is delivered in a very composed manner, allowing you to adjust your tie and rush for a meeting at the same time. It’s only when you activate launch control that it’s advisable to keep any hot liquids away from your person, as the results will not be pleasant if you do not, I assure you. Dynamically the Panamera is a large vehicle so you don’t expect it to be incredible at handling. You’d be wrong as it can swing it’s hips and do the cha cha in a way that befits a car much smaller in size.

Porsche Panamera 4s

Which takes us back to this obsessive compulsive disorder that Porsche has. Their goal is to make everything work exceedingly well in this car. From the space it offers you, to its road manners and even the way it sounds, it does a sterling job at being very good at everything. As a result, it’s a tough car to find fault with. Who buys it then? The person who requires space, space a 911 cannot provide. In essence, the Panamera is a 911 with four doors. The everyday sports car with everyday practicality. It does not shout to the world that it’s worth R1.6 million, but it does have a presence about it. It still makes a powerful statement when you arrive anywhere in it. It says a lot without saying much. For the driver focused buyer in need of a luxury vehicle, this car answers many questions and then some.

Pricing for the Porsche Panamera in South Africa

Porsche Panamera 4s : R1,638,000

Porsche Panamera 4S Sport Turismo: R1,717,000

Porsche Panamera 4S Executive: R1,873,000

McLaren on a misson: 720S lands in South Africa.

McLaren 720S South Africa

McLaren 720s launched in South Africa

McLaren 720S South Africa

What do you do when you’re up against competitor brands that have had decades to create iconic masterpieces? Brands that have lodged themselves deep in the minds of individuals and have become idols and symbols for success? The only way to differentiate yourself is to try and be, faster, better and smarter. This is what McLaren have done, and in a very short space of time since they’ve entered the mainstream supercar game, they’ve produced incredible machines. To say they’ve progressed leaps and bounds would be an understatement. One gets the impression that McLaren engineers don’t sleep, all they do is obsess about being the best. Welcome the Mclaren 720S.

McLaren 720S South Africa

Without driving the new McLaren 720S and by simply looking at the specs, you realise that the brand has entered a new realm of supercar stardom. The number 720S denotes the power the car produces which is 536 kW an astonishing figure from a twin turbocharged 4.0 V8. The engine, named the M840T revs to 8500rpm and has a peak torque figure of 770Nm. All that anger is channelled through a seven-speed dual clutch transmission, which will propel the driver to 100km/h in 2.9 seconds. 100km/h is irrelevant for a car like this but rather the fact that it takes 7.8 seconds to reach 200km/h is the most noteworthy attribute when it comes to how this vehicle sprints. Weighing in a 1283kg, one sees how this car produces such figures but the largest contributing factor is the Carbon Fibre Monocage II. Seen first in the McLaren P1, the 720S makes use of this single piece carbon fibre tub that includes the roof. As a result, this aids the vehicle rigidity and of course, mass.

McLaren 720S South Africa

As we’ve come to expect in a McLaren, intelligent driver aids make operating these cars an accessible task for most drivers. A Normal, Sport or Track mode can be activated making sure that your 720S maintains composure on an average road yet maximum thrills on the track. Regarding how the car handles, the 720S’s chassis is featured with Proactive Chassis Control II. This system uses sensors to scan the road and pre-empt the chassis to provide maximum grip depending on the setting. For the track days that 720S drivers will attend, there is a feature called Variable Drift Control. Judging by the wording, you can imagine that the 720S will allow for smooth controlled oversteer angles. You would be correct, but the purpose of this mode is not just to make the driver feel like Chris Harris, but rather to assist the driver on a racetrack. If you’ve experienced traction control cutting power in a rear wheel drive car, you’ll know that it can rob a driver of precious seconds during a hot lap. By allowing for certain degrees of slip, the 720S will allow the car to get into oversteer without interfering, until it feels the car reach a specific angle that is too far gone. What this means is that there will be less interference on a track, allowing the driver to have a safety net but not spinning should things get too sideways.

McLaren 720S South Africa

As a whole, the 720S takes the McLaren brand to an entirely new level. This is no mere tweak here and there, it’s a whole new car regarding internals and design. Speaking of design, McLaren has incorporated new design language both inside and outside the vehicle. Based on a great white shark, the front end is more aggressive and differs greatly to the McLarens we’ve seen in the last few years. Entering the vehicle is also much easier, and the cabin is very driver focused. To put the icing on the cake, the instrument display has the ability to fold, giving you a Batmobile-like feel and increased visibility. Only the best materials are used in the car, assuring you that the R5.5 million you’ve spent is worth it. McLaren’s quest for world domination can be seen in the design of this car. Everything about screams more, more and more. This brand may not have the heritage of its competitors, but its new school determined attitude is ever so appealing. It’s the disruptor of the game and it means serious business.    

McLaren 720s pricing in South Africa

The McLaren 720s is on sale now for R5.5 million. Contact Daytona South Africa for more information.

A Light show to say hello? : Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe

Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe

Updated Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe launched

Mercedes-Benz E-Class

The Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe has recently been launched and aside from looking a bit like a Renault Laguna Coupe from the rear, it promises to be quite the vehicle. Big news is that it “Welcomes you” and “says goodbye” by using both the headlights and taillights to perform a bit of a show. You can see that here.

Based on the tech-laden Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedan, the Coupe promises to be just as advanced and connected, all while offering a slightly sportier and dynamic drive.

Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe

Merged under a single lens, the two optional 12.3-inch displays give a widescreen effect and relay all relevant information to the driver, including infotainment and the instrument-cluster within the driver’s field of vision. Should this option not be selected, a more conventional system of dials and an infotainment screen is fitted. Along with the air-conditioning vents, reminiscent of turbines, the interior also features an advanced ambient lighting system with 64 available colours, and of course the highest quality materials. Strangely, the designers have opted to carry over the awkward, miniature C-pillar as seen on the previous generation E-Class Coupe, an interesting design cue…

The engine lineup consists of two 2.0-litre turbocharged petrol motors (135 kW/300 N.m and 180 kW/370 N.m) a 3.0-litre turbocharged petrol V6 (245 kW/480 N.m) and a 2.0-litre turbo diesel motor (143 kW/ 400 N.m) with model designations being E200, E300, E400 and E220d respectively.

Mercedes-Benz E-Class

The standard suspension system is 15mm lower than that of the E-Class Coupe which translate to a more dynamic drive. Alternatively, both Dynamic Select and Air Body Control multi chamber suspension systems are optionally available. Both Avantgarde and AMG Line trims can be had with the E-Class coupe, each offering something different to the discerning Mercedes-Benz customer.

As with all tech-laden cars these days, you can integrate your smartphone into the infotainment system, as well as let the car park itself and also drive itself (sort of) with Mercedes-Benz’s semi-autonomous driving system or Drive Pilot, which is able to follow another vehicle up to 210 km/h.

Mercedes-Benz E-Class

Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe pricing in South Africa

The E-Class Coupe is on sale in South Africa, all models coming standard with a 6 year/100 000km maintenance plan. Pricing is as follows:

E200 – R754 500

E220d – R806 500

E300 – R842 500

E400 – R1 021 500

Will the new Volkswagen Polo GTI make Golf GTI buyers think twice?

VW Polo GTI

Will the new Volkswagen Polo GTI make Golf GTI buyers think twice in the future?

VW Golf 7.5 GTI

By now you would’ve heard about the upcoming new Volkswagen Polo. The new range promises to usher in a new benchmark within its segment. Judging by what’s on offer and the unconditional love South Africans have for the Polo, it will be a guaranteed success. Interestingly, South Africa also happens to be one of the largest GTI markets in the world, making the three letters offered by VW, a coveted symbol amongst young and old. The recent launch of the updated Golf 7.5 GTI had many salivating yet others have begun to worry. This is due to the fact that a new Golf GTI now costs just under R550 000. Of course the competition is priced similarly, but what was once a young man’s car has become a young executives car in terms of pricing. Which brings us to our question, will the upcoming Volkswagen Polo GTI make future Golf GTI buyers think twice before purchasing?

VW Polo GTI

As you know the new Volkswagen Polo GTI will feature a 2.0 litre turbocharged engine, producing 147kW and paired with a 7 speed DSG gearbox. This is nothing to scoff at as it is not too far off from the Golf’s 169kW. “It’s still a Polo you may think”, but the new Polo will also have Virtual Cockpit, it will also have the option of LED headlights and it will have most of the technology offered in the current Golf. The biggest drawback for most then might be space, because the Golf’s dimensions have always been near perfect, even for those with families.

VW Polo GTI

The new Polo is smaller, but not small per se. It’s longer, wider and taller than the current Polo. Most notably is the boot space that will be offered, 351 litres compared to 280 litres in the current Polo. With all these things considered, it’s safe to say that the new Polo is going to offer a heap load of goodness. So much goodness that it may detract from a confuse a Golf buyer? Only time will tell. What is certain is that the upcoming Polo GTI will not be the same price as the Golf, it will obviously be noticeably cheaper. In the worlds current situation with most cutting costs, it wouldn’t be too surprising to see some opt for the “baby brother” and save some money, especially if it follows through on its promise to offer great performance and practicality.  

Mercedes-AMG E43 and E63S Released in South Africa

Mercedes-AMG E63S

Mercedes-AMG E43 and E63S

About a year after the release of the new Mercedes-Benz E-Class, the German automaker has brought the fire back into the range through the introduction of the big power, big engine performance variants of the new model – The Mercedes-AMG E43 and E63S models.

Mercedes-AMG E43

Taking the position as the entry level performance E-Class is the E43, with headline figures of 295 kW delivered at 6100 rpm and peak torque at 520 N.m, heralded from just 2000 rpm through to 5000 rpm. All this power is produced from the 3.0-litre twin turbo V6 we first saw in the C43 AMG.

Mercedes-AMG E43

In line with the new AMG mantra of rear bias AMG 4Matic, the drive is to all four wheels and will provide for a 31:69 split of power. The new attitude towards drivetrain dynamics is good for a 4.6-second 0-100 sprint and the obligatory 250km/h German car speed limiter. Drive will be through a new 9-speed G-Tronic Automatic gearbox.

The preeminent act being the E63S AMG model and dubbed ‘The most powerful E-Class ever’, it delivers a colossal 450 kW between 5750-6500 rpm from a twinturbo 4.0 Litre V8 and 850 N.m of torque, from 2500-4500 rpm. The employment of the 4Matic system aids in the 3.4 second 0-100 km/h scurry, smashing the likes of the RS6 Avant and F10 M5 for a best in class time. Top speed is again pegged at 250km/h with the option of a higher 300 km/h limit with the AMG Driver’s package. A beefier 9-speed MCT dual-clutch box helps to translate all the power into movement, along with rather evocative noises.

Both models employ the Sporty Air Body control in the pursuit of agility and neutrality in the twisties. This system works in tandem with the Adaptive Dampening systems that allow for the selection of three driving modes – Comfort, Sport and Sport Plus, as a means of adaptation the vehicle to the conditions and requirements of the driver.

Mercedes-AMG E63S

Based on the E-Class, the list of technical wizardry tricks and electronics is long and vast. Features such as Connected Me and Remote online are available, which allow for phone integration through an app that allows vehicle data to be viewed remotely along with a Vehicle Tracking and a Parked Vehicle Locator system with remote unlock and locking.

With the E63S taking the fight directly to the new M5, much debate and kafuffle will surround these rivals, all while still offering a milder option for the less brave, or endowed given the almost R2 million rand price.

Mercedes-AMG E63S

Mercedes-AMG E43 and E63S Pricing in South Africa

Mercedes-AMG E 43 4MATIC: R1 165 800

Mercedes-AMG E 63 S 4MATIC+: R1 868 400

All vehicles come with a 6-year/100 00km PremiumDrive maintenance plan. Visit Mercedes-Benz for more details.

 

 

Khanye Ngwenya

Junior Writer

The B7 Audi RS4 – The more door, Quattro V8 racer?

B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

The B7 Audi RS4 – Driven

The era of analogue, man and machine connections has become a rather rare occurrence in modern automotive machinery. Electronic nannies seek to tame the wave of kW’s that even the most unassuming of ‘fast’ cars now have. Me being a rather backwards human frankly, I loved this era, the sheer amount of fear that these cars were able to place in there pilots, but more to the point, they highlighted the greater need for driver skill and the size of the man meat that was needed when pressing on.

 

B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

Now, being a rather primitive being, that was automotive nirvana and replication of this sensation is a constant feature in my motoring escapades. Enter the B7 Audi RS4, an 11-year old, 4 door saloon with three pedals protruding from the firewall and a stonking good 4.2 Litre V8, mated to the grippy AWD Quattro drivetrain. From the exterior, highly unassuming, with only large oval-shaped exhausts to suggest any sporting prowess. In its prime, good for a 4.6 second 0-100 sprint and despite the “Big Three’s” 250km/h handshake, would only run out of puff at around 266km/h. This arguably was a drive I had lusted after for since its conception and frankly, in the cold month of June, brought an awkward bout of the chesties.

Climbing into the cabin, one is instantly groped by the enormous Recaro leather buckets, as the busyness of the cabin hints as to the progress that interior design has come.  Design and fascia are high quality, even by today’s standards, and feels well put together but ultimately still very much a button-heavy setup. The biggest and shiniest of these being most important,  as I quickly identified the centre console mounted Start/Stop button.  A quick stab at this lets lose to a deep and burly roar, as the Audi comes to life. The steering wheel, with its perforated leather and flat bottom aluminium accents, feels meaty to hand and hints as to the capability that the brute beholds.

B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

Driving

On the move, the V8 soundtrack is rather invigorating, even at low speeds, and yet seems to only get better as you chase the stratospheric redline at 8 200 rpm. The cruising ability is ever apparent as you can potter around rather easily. With 430 N.m on tap, 90% of which is delivered from 2 250 to 7 600 rpm, the in-gear pulling power is immense and lofting around town proved effortless. This was not the focus of the RS4, however. It’s not a city run-around but a raging brute, onwards, in pursuit of the perfect driving road which was soon on the agenda. A short drive out of the hustle and bustle of the city and the R563 between Hekpoort and Krugersdorp comes into sight, a short 9.3 km stretch of tarmac that provides for some decent fun.  No Sport modes and dynamic setting trickery here, just a poke at the traction control button, a drop at the cogs and the smiles begin. The V8 is truly ridiculous. It sounds so damn good as it pushes you on vicariously, as you don the façade of a Tiff Needell or a Chris Harris. The Gearbox is slick and slides through the ratios at the greatest of ease, with a short throw and this invigoration that makes you feel rather good. The pedal placement is perfect with hell-toe shifts being ever so easy, the V8 caterwaul from the exhausts coaxing more exuberance with the throttle.

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

B7 Audi RS4 South Africa

When shown some corners, the AWD system on the B7 Audi RS4 does a very good job of keeping things under control, with it being almost idiot proof when jumping on the gas existing corners. A light controlled understeer tone envelopes the driving experience, that keeps you from pushing too hard into the corners but this never seems to kill the fun, it’s almost a warning of impending doom. Only when being stupid does the front let go all together but even still in such a slow and controlled motion, it allows for plenty of time to regain composure before kissing the guardrail.

 

Enquire about a new or used Audi vehicle at Audi Centurion here!

 

Khanye Ngwenya 

Junior Writer